A Guide to Crop Rotation – Growing a productive garden


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A good gardening principle called ‘crop rotation’ suggests that you should rotate your annual crops each year to avoid growing the same crop in the same area year after year.

Crop rotation prevents the nutrients becoming depleted in each area as each type of crop needs different nutrition. It also helps reduce the impact of bugs and diseases.

Obviously if you are growing perennial (long life, over a few years) plants you will not be moving these each year. I also recommend growing invasive plants in their own bed like yams (oca) Jerusalem artichoke and mint. Otherwise you will have them EVERYWHERE.

Vegetable Garden Plan for Crop Rotation

When you are planting your vegetable garden, having a planting plan written down somewhere is really handy for forward planning.

You can make a note of of the dates you plant crops and their varieties, which allows you to estimate when crops will be finished and plan what you will replace them with following the crop rotation process.

Crop rotation can be carried out in a four season cycle, or more if you prefer. A minimum of three years is recommended. Certain vegetables are grouped together into different sections of the vegetable patch, and these groups are then rotated each season of the year.

Simply divide your current garden into 3-6 plots of similar size and label them years 1-whatever number you have.

Heirloom Seeds from our Family to Yours

Perennial vegetables such as soft fruit, rhubarb, asparagus and globe artichoke aren’t replanted each year, so they may need their own dedicated bed.

Crop Rotation Rules

As a general rule brassicas follow legumes: Sow crops such as cabbage, cauliflower and kale on soil previously used for beans and peas. The legumes fix nitrogen in the soil, and leafy greens benefit from the nutrient-rich conditions created.

Very rich soil and roots don’t mix: Avoid planting root vegetables on areas which have been heavily fertilized, as this will cause lush foliage at the expense of the edible parts of the plant.

In a rotation system, crops are grouped together according to preferred soil type, required nutrients and the types of pests and diseases that threaten them as well as considering good plant companions.

Different guides will group crops together differently, but here are some common group options.

6 Bed crop rotation might contain one bed of each of the following:
Potato family: e.g. potato, tomato, eggplant, capsicum. (eggplant, capsicum and chillies need a glass house down south)
Cucurbits: e.g. courgette, cucumber, pumpkin, squash.
Legumes: e.g. peas, beans.
Brassicas and salads: e.g. broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, spinach, lettuce, silverbeet.
Onion family: e.g. onions, garlic, leeks, shallot.
Root vegetables: e.g. carrots, beetroot, parsnip

4 Bed option:
Potatoes, kumara, yams, tomatoes, capsicum, chillies, pumpkins and courgettes.
Peas, beans, celery.
Brassicas and salads: e.g. cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, lettuce, silverbeet, mizuna and rocket.
Carrots, onions, beetroot, parsnip.

4 bed rotation:

YEAR ONE
BED 1 – Manure heavily and plant potatoes, yams, tomatoes, capsicum, chillies, pumpkins and courgettes.
BED 2 – Manure lightly and plant peas, beans, celery.
BED 3 – Manure lightly and plant brassicas and salads
BED 4 – No manure added and plant carrots, onions, beetroot, parsnip.

YEAR TWO – move all the beds up one space
BED 1 – Manure lightly and plant peas, beans, celery.
BED 2 – Manure lightly and plant brassicas and salads
BED 3 – No manure added and plant carrots, onions, beetroot, parsnip.
BED 4 – Manure heavily and plant potatoes, kumara, yams, tomatoes, capsicum, chillies, pumpkins and courgettes.

YEAR THREE – move all the beds up one space again
BED 1 – Manure lightly and plant brassicas and salads
BED 2 – No manure added and plant carrots, onions, beetroot, parsnip.
BED 3 – Manure heavily and plant potatoes, kumara, yams, tomatoes, capsicum, chillies, pumpkins and courgettes.
BED 4 – Manure lightly and plant peas, beans, celery.

YEAR FOUR – move all the beds up one space again
BED 1 – No manure added and plant carrots, onions, beetroot, parsnip.
BED 2 – Manure heavily and plant potatoes, kumara, yams, tomatoes, capsicum, chillies, pumpkins and courgettes.
BED 3 – Manure lightly and plant peas, beans, celery.
BED 4 – Manure lightly and plant brassicas and salads

Year 5 you are back to the beginning again. This technique can be adapted to fit how many beds you do have to rotate with. They are not a hard and fast rule and sometimes you have seedlings that just need to go in the ground and you just gotta put them in whichever bed has space. Don’t panic, it will all be OK.

For more information on companion planting read here.

For more information about when to plant and harvest different crops read here.

For further reading, I really recommend all of these books. I own every one of them and they are amazing resources!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Crop rotation is a simple concept often made difficult. With a good permaculture crop rotation system you will develop a productive garden.

 

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